Takeaways from the TensorFlow Dev Summit 2018

Posted by Brandon McKinzie on May 22, 2018

At Forge.AI, we develop capabilities for transforming unstructured streams of data into a structured format consumable by other AI systems. Tensorflow is one of the principal toolkits we use in developing and deploying our capabilities, such as hierarchical classification. This past March, I had the opportunity to attend TensorFlow Dev Summit 2018 at the  Computer History Museum in Mountain View and represent the work we are doing at Forge.AI.

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Tags: TensorFlow, TensorFlow Dev Summit, TensorFlow Extended (TFX), TensorFlow Hub, Swift for TensorFlow (TFiwS)

How We're Using Natural Language Generation to Scale at Forge.AI

Posted by Jake Neely on April 11, 2018

At Forge.AI, we capture events from unstructured data and represent them in a manner suitable for machine learning, decision making, and other algorithmic tasks for our customers (for a broad technical overview, see this blog post). In order to do this, we employ a suite of state of the art machine learning and natural language understanding technologies, many of which are supervised learning systems. For our business to scale aggressively, we need an economically viable way to acquire training data quickly for those supervised learners. We use natural language generation to do just that, supplementing human annotations with annotated synthetic language in an agile fashion.

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Tags: AI, NLU, Machine Learning, NLP, NLG, deep learning, probabilistic models, supervised learning, natural language

Knowledge Graphs for Enhanced Machine Reasoning at Forge.AI

Posted by Thomas Markovich, Ph.D. on March 14, 2018

Introduction


Natural Language Understanding at an industrial scale requires an efficient, high quality knowledge graph for tasks such as entity resolution and reasoning. Without the ability to reason about information semantically, natural language understanding systems are only capable of shallow understanding. As the requirements of machine reasoning and machine learning tasks become more complex, more advanced knowledge graphs are required. Indeed, it has been previously observed that knowledge graphs are capable of producing impressive results when used to augment and accelerate machine reasoning tasks at small scales, but struggle at large scale due to a mix of data integrity and performance issues. Solving this problem and enabling machine driven semantic reasoning at scale is one of the foundational technological challenges that we are addressing at Forge.AI.

To understand the complexity of this task, it's necessary to define what a knowledge graph is. There are many academic definitions floating around, but most are replete with jargon and impenetrable. Simply said, a knowledge graph is a graph where each vertex represents an entity and each edge is directed and represents a relationship between entities. Entities are typically proper nouns and concepts (e.g. Apple and Company, respectively), with the edges representing verbs (e.g. Is A). Together, these form large networks that encode semantic information. For example, encoding the fact that "Apple is a Company" in the knowledge graph is done by storing two vertices, one for "Apple" and one for "Company", with a directed edge originating with Apple and pointing to Company of type "isA". This is visualized in Figure 1:

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Tags: AI, NLU, Machine Learning, Technology, NLP, Data, Reasoning, entity resolution, knowledge graph, embeddings

Hierarchical Classification at Forge.AI

Posted by Brandon McKinzie on March 2, 2018

Motivation

Suppose you’d like to classify individual documents at multiple levels of specificity. In addition, you’d also like to know whether a document contains multiple topics and with what confidence. For example, as I write this Google News is displaying an article titled Income Stocks With A Trump Tax Bonus. We may want to capture the main topics contained in the article along with an associated measure of our confidence that those topics are contained in the article. Such a classification might look something like the following

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Tags: AI, NLU, Machine Learning, Technology, NLP, Data, attention network, neural network, hierarchical classifier

Forge.AI: Technical Overview

Posted by Forge.AI on February 21, 2018

Overview

The human brain is a remarkable instrument with highly evolved regions for understanding, reasoning, and decision making. When humans communicate, they typically speak or write to directly convey information. Information can be transmitted through email, text message, phone, web page, social media etc. to desired targets. Effective communication enables the semantics of what is attempting to be communicated to be properly received and interpreted. Our brains have highly developed regions, such as the angular gyrus, Wernicke’s area and Broca’s area, focused on reading and speech comprehension and the application of information to reasoning and decision-making processes.

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Tags: AI, NLU, Machine Learning, Technology, NLP, Data, Language, Knowledge, Reasoning

Unstructured Data: A Critical Fuel

Posted by Jim Crowley on January 28, 2018

2017 saw numerous advances in the development of Artificial Intelligence technologies, setting the stage for a massive transformative impact across the corporate landscape in 2018 and beyond. AI-powered solutions are now deciding (or helping businesses decide) what stocks to trade, how to best optimize supply chains, who to hire, probability of customer churn, brand sentiment, optimal pricing strategies and how to best model, how to monitor and manage risk, just to name a few. The corporate uses of AI are growing by the day.

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